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    1. Separating fact from fiction using a 'fake news' algorithm

      Separating fact from fiction using a 'fake news' algorithm

      Separating fact from fiction using a 'fake news' algorithm February 16, 2017 by Adela Talbot Victoria Rubin, a professor in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies, has been working on deception detection since 2010, more recently focusing on developing an algorithm to detect fake news. Credit: Adela Talbot // Western News The impetus behind Victoria Rubin's research is a tip from Ernest Hemingway: "Develop a built-in bullshit detector."

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    2. Putting data in the hands of doctors

      Putting data in the hands of doctors

      Putting data in the hands of doctors February 16, 2017 by Meg Murphy MIT Professor Regina Barzilay has struck up new research collaborations, drawn in MIT students, launched projects with local doctors, and begun empowering cancer treatment with the machine-learning insight that has already transformed many areas of modern life. Credit: Lillie Paquette/School of Engineering Regina Barzilay is working with MIT students and medical doctors in an ambitious bid to revolutionize cancer care.

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    3. Zuckerberg builds software butler for his home

      Zuckerberg builds software butler for his home

      Zuckerberg builds software butler for his home December 19, 2016 Mark Zuckerberg's artificial intelligence-imbued software "butler"—named Jarvis—is now in service, and even plays with his family, the Facebook chief said Monday. Zuckerberg took on the personal project this year, devoting about 100 hours to making a system inspired by the "Iron Man" film character Jarvis as a virtual assistant to help manage his household.

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      Mentions: Mark Zuckerberg
    4. Would you expect a 'real man' to tweet 'cute' or not?

      Would you expect a 'real man' to tweet 'cute' or not?

      Would you expect a 'real man' to tweet 'cute' or not? November 21, 2016 Word clouds show the words in tweets that raters mistakenly attributed to Female authors (left) or Males (right). The larger the word appears, the more often the raters were fooled by it. Word color indicates the frequency of the word; gray is least frequent, then blue, and dark red is the most frequent. The url tag means they used a link in their tweet.

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    5. Google teaches machines to become more fluent translators

      Google teaches machines to become more fluent translators

      Google teaches machines to become more fluent translators November 15, 2016 Google is promising that its widely used translation service is now even more fluent, thanks to an advance that's enabling its computers to interpret complete sentences. That may sound simple, but it took years of engineering to pull off. Until now, Google's technology analyzed phrases in pieces and then cobbled together a sometimes stilted translation.

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    6. Real men don't say 'cute': Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes

      Real men don't say 'cute': Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes

      Real men don't say 'cute': Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes November 15, 2016 "Inaccurate stereotypes" indicate words (c) written by men but characterized as female, or (d) written by women but characterized as male. Word size indicates strength of the correlation and word color indicates relative word frequency. Carpenter et. al.

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    7. Artificial-intelligence system surfs web to improve its performance

      Artificial-intelligence system surfs web to improve its performance

      Artificial-intelligence system surfs web to improve its performance November 10, 2016 Of the vast wealth of information unlocked by the Internet, most is plain text. The data necessary to answer myriad questions—about, say, the correlations between the industrial use of certain chemicals and incidents of disease, or between patterns of news coverage and voter-poll results—may all be online.

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    8. Fujitsu leverages AI to develop highly accurate recognition technology for strings of handwritten Chinese characters

      Fujitsu leverages AI to develop highly accurate recognition technology for strings of handwritten Chinese characters

      Fujitsu leverages AI to develop highly accurate recognition technology for strings of handwritten Chinese characters November 8, 2016 Figure 1: Recognition results for a string of characters with existing deep learning models. Credit: Fujitsu Fujitsu today announced the development of an artificial intelligence model that can generate highly reliable recognition of handwritten character strings.

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      Mentions: Japan China Fujitsu
    9. IBM Watson's new conversational capabilities bring brands and consumers closer

      IBM Watson's new conversational capabilities bring brands and consumers closer

      IBM Watson's new conversational capabilities bring brands and consumers closer October 26, 2016 by Katy Rosati IBM today introduced Watson Virtual Agent, a cognitive conversational technology that allows businesses to simply build and deploy conversational agents. These agents, or "bots," have emerged as businesses look to improve customer engagement, offering customers quick responses to queries and addressing potential issues in real time.

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    10. Eyetracking data can improve language technology and help readers

      Eyetracking data can improve language technology and help readers

      Eyetracking data can improve language technology and help readers October 24, 2016 Credit: University of Copenhagen New research from the University of Copenhagen shows that recordings of gaze data - within a few seconds - can reveal whether a word causes a reader problems. This insight could be used to alleviate reading problems with software that offer translations of difficult words or suggest easier texts as soon as readers experience problems.

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    11. What the presidential candidates' data can tell us about Trump and Clinton

      What the presidential candidates' data can tell us about Trump and Clinton

      What the presidential candidates' data can tell us about Trump and Clinton October 18, 2016 by Rick Hutley, The Conversation It's election season, and the candidates' and campaigns' eyes are on you, the voter. Figuring out what you think about something a candidate said last night or tweeted this morning is very big business. All this gathering of data, from statewide and national polls and social media alike, can make it seem as if everything we do – or even think – is under scrutiny.

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    12. How Experian is turning big data into big dollars

      How Experian is turning big data into big dollars

      How Experian is turning big data into big dollars October 5, 2016 by Mike Freeman, The San Diego Union-Tribune At Experian DataLabs, a team of scientists is thwarting bad guys with math. A top-five U.S. credit card issuer recently dumped about 6 billion transaction records on the San Diego outfit to see if its fancy machine learning mathematical formulas could do a better job of rooting out credit card fraud than the bank's existing system.

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    13. It's not 'corporate poaching' – it's a free market for brilliant people

      It's not 'corporate poaching' – it's a free market for brilliant people

      It's not 'corporate poaching' – it's a free market for brilliant people August 3, 2016 by Andrew W. Moore, The Conversation When brains are able to go where their interests lie, everyone benefits. Credit: shutterstock.com When Uber decided to develop its own self-driving car, it went big. The company came to Carnegie Mellon University , the epicenter for autonomous driving research for three decades , and hired away four professors and 36 technical staff members.

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    14. First major database of non-native English

      First major database of non-native English

      First major database of non-native English July 29, 2016 by Larry Hardesty English is the most used language on the Internet, and globally most of the people who speak or write in English are non-native speakers. A new database of annotated English sentences written by non-native speakers could help improve how computers handle the spoken or written language of non-native English speakers.

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    15. Researchers want to achieve machine translation of the 24 languages of the EU

      Researchers want to achieve machine translation of the 24 languages of the EU

      Researchers want to achieve machine translation of the 24 languages of the EU July 7, 2016 Professor of Translation-Oriented Language Technologies at Saarland University and a Scientific Director at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence. Credit: DFKI The aim of their collaboration is to achieve machine-based translation between the languages of the European Union so that comprehensible texts are achieved for as many language combinations as possible.

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    16. IBM unveils cognitive exploration to drive better business outcomes

      IBM unveils cognitive exploration to drive better business outcomes

      IBM today announced the availability of a cognitive-infused Watson Explorer, a powerful combination of data exploration and content analytics capabilities. Typical organizations only use 12 percent of their dataˡ, leaving a wealth of untapped information across the enterprise that could be leveraged to make smarter decisions. Watson Explorer equips users with the information and analytics ...

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      Mentions: IBM Watson Explorer
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