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    1. Johnson: Why translators have the blues

      Johnson: Why translators have the blues

      TRANSLATION can be lonely work, which may well be why most translators choose the career out of interest, not because they crave attention. Until recently, a decent translator could expect a steady, tidy living, too. But the industry is undergoing a wrenching change that will make life hard for the timid. Most translators are freelancers, and with the rise of the internet a good translator could live in Kentucky and work for Swiss banks.

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    2. Johnson: Translation platforms cannot replace humans

      Johnson: Translation platforms cannot replace humans

      ARAB newspapers have a reputation, partly deserved, for tamely taking the official line. On any given day, for example, you might read that “a source close to the Iranian Foreign Ministry told Al-Hayat that ‘Tehran will continue to abide by the terms of the nuclear agreement as long as the other side does the same.’” But the exceptional thing about this unexceptional story is that, thanks to Google, English-speaking readers can now read this in the Arab papers themselves.

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    3. The giant shoulders of English

      The giant shoulders of English

      The giant shoulders of English The advantages of having a scholarly lingua franca should not obscure the disadvantages Feb 4th 2017 Tweet “EVERYONE who matters speaks English.” So say many in Britain and America. In fact, a lot of people do not. But in some domains, this crude approximation is true: in globalised enterprises the world’s single scholarly language is increasingly indispensable. Among those global enterprises is science, in which more and more work is being done in English.

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      Discourse, Entailment, Machine Translation, NER, Parsing, Segmentation, Semantic, Sentiment, Summarization, WSD