1. Articles from Financial Review

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    1. Robotic software sweeping large accounting firms and clients

      Robotic software sweeping large accounting firms and clients

      Accounting firms have recently employed the virtual bots in their own offices, as well as advised clients to use them. Robert Markowitz by Nicole Norfleet Marna Ricker has her own personal robot. While it doesn't shoot lasers or clean her Minneapolis office Roomba-style, her "bot" can do some of her digital data dirty work so she doesn't have to. "I don't want to sit at my computer and do process type of work," said Ricker, the central region tax managing partner at Ernst & Young.

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    2. Data-driven 'signature medicine' to drive future treatment

      Data-driven 'signature medicine' to drive future treatment

      The sheer scale of data will assist in everything from picking up early warning signs of an individual's illness to predicting an epidemic. Supplied Share on twitter Share on Google Plus by Jill Margo In the modern era, medicine has been chopped up into bits. There is a different specialist for each bit of the body and often one expert doesn't quite know what's happening in other parts of the patient, and doesn't have the time to find out either. However, this is predicted to change.

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      Mentions: Google
    3. Australian Adobe rival Nitro raises $19.7 million and has an Asx Ipo in mind

      Australian Adobe rival Nitro raises $19.7 million and has an Asx Ipo in mind

      Australian Adobe rival Nitro raises $19.7 million and has an ASX IPO in mind Share Nitro chief executive Sam Chandler has closed a $19.7 million funding round for the company. Stefan Postles by Yolanda Redrup Australian-founded document productivity business Nitro has closed a $US15 million ($19.7 million) Series C capital raise from a mixture of venture capital and institutional investors, as the business prepares for a potential ASX listing in the next few years.

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    4. Kaplan buys Red Marker

      Kaplan buys Red Marker

      Matt Symons, co-founder of Red Marker and SocietyOne, built an AI engine that will soon power global bank education. Jessica Hromas Share on twitter by James Eyers The education of more than 50,000 workers in Australia's financial services sector will be powered by home-grown artificial intelligence technology after global education provider Kaplan acquired Sydney-based regtech start-up Red Marker.

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    5. Get in front of the consumer decision or be left behind

      Get in front of the consumer decision or be left behind

      Advertising is at its most impactful at the point a decision to purchase is made, but identifying that crucial moment has been very difficult, until now. Sean Gallup by Karen Nelson-Field Imagine if it were possible to know precisely, without any online search triggers, when someone was just about to make a buying decision? Psychic? Or the future of marketing science?

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      Mentions: Amazon Google Netflix
    6. Macquarie signals appetite for more investor lending

      Macquarie signals appetite for more investor lending

      Greg Ward (right), head of Macquarie's banking and financial services group, alongside CEO Nicholas Moore. email@seandaveyphotographer.com Share on twitter by James Eyers Macquarie Bank is keen to write more loans to property investors even though its momentum in the mortgage market is slipping, and is betting that an open approach to data will help reignite business lending, which has also been lagging behind the big four.

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      Mentions: Woolworths
    7. Tablet sales set to drop in 2017 as consumers turn to smartphones and laptops

      Tablet sales set to drop in 2017 as consumers turn to smartphones and laptops

      Consumers prefer mobiles, TV and computers to tablets. Bloomberg Share on twitter by Max Mason Sales of tablets, such as Apple's iPad and Samsung's Galaxy Tab, may have peaked with consumers preferring smartphones, laptops, desktop computers and TV for information and entertainment. Deloitte, in its technology, media and telecommunications predictions for 2017, is forecasting that tablet sales will drop by 10 per cent this year, to 165 million units worldwide.

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    8. Banks mull IBM Watson's regtech offering

      Banks mull IBM Watson's regtech offering

      IBM's super computer, Watson, is being offered to global banks. AP Share on twitter by James Eyers IBM wants Australian banks to consider adopting its artificial intelligence supercomputer, Watson, to guide their regulatory compliance, identify risk and enhance customer relationships, but the technology behemoth is pitching against a growing number of open source alternatives.

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    9. 5 Things You Should Know About Cognitive Computing'S Disruptive Force

      5 Things You Should Know About Cognitive Computing'S Disruptive Force

      Business uses of cognitive computing are useful only if they are consistent, accurate, and reliable. ipopba Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Centre for Information Systems Research interviewed business and technology leaders at 33 companies about 51 cognitive computing projects to try to answer the following questions: How disruptive a force is cognitive computing? Will it radically change businesses and jobs?

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      Mentions: Amazon Apple Google
    10. The Chanticleer CEO outlook poll in full

      The Chanticleer CEO outlook poll in full

      CEOs are concerned about the threat to Australia's AAA credit rating, confused about the impact of a Trump presidency and agree that big business needs to do a better job explaining itself to the wider community. by Tony Boyd Michael Smith Thirty-five of the country's leading chief executives have singled out the nation's incoherent energy policy as one of their main concerns.

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    11. ATO deploys Alex a talking 'Siri for tax' digital assistant you can talk to

      ATO deploys Alex a talking 'Siri for tax' digital assistant you can talk to

      Nuance enterprise Australia and New Zealand managing director Robert Schwarz says the ATO's digital assistant gets better over time as the software learns on the job. John Doughty Share on twitter Share on Google Plus by Yolanda Redrup The Australian Taxation Office is pushing forward with its "digital by default" strategy, striking a deal with US-tech multilingual software computer giant Nuance Communications to implement a virtual assistant called Alex, in the style of Siri or Cortana, to allow people to serve themselves. While the software is being unveiled on Wednesday, the ATO has been using it with customers since ...

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    12. Artificial intelligence in mind as Commonwealth Bank develops future tech

      Artificial intelligence in mind as Commonwealth Bank develops future tech

      Commonwealth Bank CIO David Whiteing says his team cannot become obsessed with present challenges and neglect the future. Ben Rushton Share on twitter by James Eyers Commonwealth Bank of Australia is developing artificial intelligence technology to help with cyber security, fraud detection and regulatory compliance, in a sign banks are attempting to put the power of big data to use in reducing risk.

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    13. Inside the Medallion Fund, a $74 billion money-making machine like no other

      Inside the Medallion Fund, a $74 billion money-making machine like no other

      Apart from James Simons, who retired in 2009 to focus on philanthropic causes, relatively little has been known about this small group of scientists. by Katherine Burton Sixty miles east of Wall Street, a spit of land shaped like a whale's tail separates Long Island Sound and Conscience Bay. The mansions here, with their long, gated driveways and million-dollar views, are part of a hamlet called Old Field. Locals have another name for these moneyed lanes: the Renaissance Riviera.

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    14. Red Marker shows banks the regtech way

      Red Marker shows banks the regtech way

      Matt Symons, co-founder of Red Marker, says the start-up can dynamically identify risky content as it's being produced. Michele Mossop Share on twitter by James Eyers Machine learning and artificial intelligence will help banks reduce regulatory compliance costs and incidents of bad advice, said Westpac Banking Corp chief executive Brian Hartzer, as the application of 'regtech' gathers pace around the globe.

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    15. Macquarie Uni partners with VoiceBox Technologies to commercialise AI research

      Macquarie Uni partners with VoiceBox Technologies to commercialise AI research

      Macquarie University professor Mark Johnson will be leading a new voice artificial intelligence centre in partnership with US company VoiceBox Technologies. James Brickwood Share on twitter Share on Google Plus by Yolanda Redrup Macquarie University has formed a partnership with US-based natural language technology business, VoiceBox Technologies, to create a new voice artificial intelligence (AI) centre of excellence, with a focus on commercialising the research of PhD scientists in the field.

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    16. Cognitive computing: man and machine in partnership

      Cognitive computing: man and machine in partnership

      "Cognitive is a partnership of man and machine," says Fergal Murphy, head of cognitive solutions for IBM ANZ. Getty Images by Beverley Head Cognitive computing will usher in a new wave of change, giving organisations the power to gain insights and make decisions from vast amounts of data. Over the next 12 to 18 months these new systems will begin to replace the programmable computers we have known since the 1940s.

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      Mentions: IBM IDC Kpmg
    17. Google's robot parser, Parsey McParseface, doesn't speak money

      Google's robot parser, Parsey McParseface, doesn't speak money

      Linguistic learning: Parsey McParseface breaks down a sentence into its subject, dependant and root. Share on twitter by Michael Bailey Google claims its new open-source English parser understands 94 per cent of professionally written English and 90 per cent of blogs and discussion forums, yet that is less than the accuracy an expert says is required for natural language processing products to be commercial.

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    1-19 of 19
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