1. Articles from newscientist.com

  2. 1-24 of 36 1 2 »
    1. Google uses neural networks to translate without transcribing

      Google uses neural networks to translate without transcribing

      Google uses neural networks to translate without transcribing I hear you Floresco Images/Getty By Matt Reynolds Google’s latest take on machine translation could make it easier for people to communicate with those speaking a different language, by translating speech directly into text in a language they understand. Machine translation of speech normally works by first converting it into text, then translating that into text in another language.

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    2. Machine learning reveals lack of female screen time in top films

      Machine learning reveals lack of female screen time in top films

      Machine learning reveals lack of female screen time in top films Machine learning can help show how long women are on screen 20th Century Fox By Matt Reynolds Machine learning is taking on Hollywood’s gender bias. Technology that automatically detects how often men and women appear on screen reveals that in recent popular films, men have had almost twice as much screen time as women.

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    3. AI reads your tweets and spots when you’re being sarcastic

      AI reads your tweets and spots when you’re being sarcastic

      AI reads your tweets and spots when you’re being sarcastic That is so funny, not Alexey Kopytko/Getty ok thanks for being a great caring person! ah got to love that iPhone battery lol @BernieSanders and obama doing a great job #sarcasm Without a helpful hashtag, picking up on sarcasm online can be hard even for humans. For literal-minded computers, it’s often a major headache. But now a machine learning system can automatically recognise when individuals are being sarcastic.

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    4. Mash-up aids translation of obscure languages

      Mash-up aids translation of obscure languages
      MACHINE translation can make French, Spanish or even Japanese accessible to English speakers. But it requires a wealth of documents with copies in each relevant language to learn how to translate. This works for widely spoken languages, but it can be a tall order for some of the world's 7000 or so tongues. Software that invents languages by mashing up words from existing languages could help translate foreign texts for speakers of little-used tongues. Luis Leiva and Vicent Alabau at the Polytech
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      Mentions: France Texas Maryland
    5. Crowdsourcing improves predictive texting

      SMARTPHONES may soon get a lot better at finishing your sentences for you - with the help of words and phrases gleaned from crowdsourcing. The software packages in today's phones often struggle with texts and voice commands if a user attempts words or phrases that aren't included in the phone's database. To see if the crowd could help, Keith Vertanen of Montana Tech in Butte and Per Ola Kristensson at the University of St Andrews, UK, called upon workers of the Amazon Mechanical Turk. The plan w
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    6. Linguists break into Skype conversations

      Linguists break into Skype conversations
      Linguists break into Skype conversationsNew Scientist (blog)The team tested it on 6300 recordings in eight American English dialects and evaluated the performance using METEOR, a widely used scoring system for comparing machine translation techniques. Only 2.3 per cent scored over 0.5, meaning they are ...and more »
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    1-24 of 36 1 2 »
  1. Categories

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      Discourse, Entailment, Machine Translation, NER, Parsing, Segmentation, Semantic, Sentiment, Summarization, WSD